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Monday, January 21, 2013

Revolution Animated Webisodes - Episode 1

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   Missing Revolution on Monday nights? NBC is keeping the show’s power on during its winter hiatus by rolling out a series of animated webisodes.

   Starting today, the network is debuting online webisodes every week through Feb. 18 on NBC.com, YouTube, Hulu and on VOD. The network is also putting a version of the show’s pilot online that includes commentary from showrunner Eric Kripke and executive producer/director Jon Favreau.

   The six webisodes are based on the letters written by Sgt. Joseph Wheatly (Reed Diamond), the character who led Miles (Billy Burke) into those oxygen-depleted tunnels toward Philadelphia and into a trap set by Gen. Monroe (David Lyons).

   Kripke previously hinted about the Revolution webisodes during our exclusive interview talking about the show’s fall finale. The network also plans to post the entire first half of the season online Feb. 25, giving viewers extra chances to catch up on the show’s first 10 episode before Revolution returns on March 25.

Here is the first webisode: “Wheatley’s Letters: May 7th”
(If you can't watch it from your country, try with NBC website)


Wheatley’s Letters: May 7th


To Major Daniel Christensen, Monroe Militia I&I

My name is Joseph Wheatley. I am - I was - a corporal in the Militia, stationed with the 4th Battalion at the Holtwood crossing encampment west of Philadelphia. I volunteered for service before the Trenton campaign, I've been in since the beginning. I was being trained as a forward scout, since I'm from this area and I'm familiar with the terrain. As you must already know, on the night of May 27th, a group of us were sent out to recon a tent village that had sprung up outside of New Holland. We approached from the foothills to the south, figuring we'd have the advantage of high ground, but the odds were against us - Rebel lookouts were waiting in the trees. We tried to retreat to the east, but ran right into the tents. There were six of us, but dozens of them. A minute later, five of us were dead. In the chaos and the dark of the woods, I saw an opportunity and I took it - I ran. I found new clothes, and the next day, a Rebel patrol found me on the side of a country road. They picked me up, took me in, as if I was just some poor farmer with an axe to grind with General Monroe. And in the past few days, I seem to have earned their trust.

I intend to break that trust. How should I proceed? To reply, leave a message in the mailbox of the burned-down house at 1424 Apple Lane.

- Cpl. Joseph Wheatley